Presbyters Uniwersytet Warszawski
ID
ER 24
Gallus, deacon in Clermont (Gaul), is chosen for a bishopric of Clermont by king Theuderic, and is therefore first ordained a presbyter. Gallus gives a feast for citizens of Clermont. Account of Gregory of Tours, "Life of the fathers", Tours (Gaul), ca 590.
6.3
 
After the death of Quintianus, bishop of Clermont, Presbyter Inpetratus from Clermont (see [18]) urges his nephew, Deacon Gallus to inform the king of the vacancy. King Theuderic decides that Gallus should take late Quintianus place.
 
Quem presbiterum ordinatum, iussit rex, ut, datis de publico expensis, cives invitarentur w ad aepulum et laetarentur ob honorem Galli futuri episcopi. Quod ita factum est. Nam referre erat solitus, non amplius donasse pro episcopatu quam unum treantem coco, qui servivit ad prandium. Post haec rex, datis ad solatium eius duobus episcopis, Arvernis eum direxit.
 
(ed. Krusch 1885: 232)
6.3
 
After the death of Quintianus, bishop of Clermont, Presbyter Inpetratus from Clermont (see [18]) urges his nephew, Deacon Gallus to inform the king of the vacancy. King Theuderic decides that Gallus should take late Quintianus place.
 
He [Gallus] was ordained presbyter and then the king commanded him to give a feast for the citizens, at the expense of the public purse, so that they would be able to rejoice in honour of Gallus, their future bishop. This was done. Gallus was fond of saying, indeed, that for his bishopric he had only given one third of a solidus, no more, and he gave that coin to the cook who had prepared the meal. After that the king sent him to Clermont, in the company of two bishops.
 
(trans. James 1911: 36).

Discussion:

Gallus' ordination is portraited as a model for other clerics as Gallus did not pay for his advancement in clerical grade (i.e. bishopric) apart from one third of the solidus given to the cook who prepared the feast for the citizens of his new see.
One should note, however, that one third of a solidus was at the time of Gregory of Tours quite a considerable amount of money.

Place of event:

Region
  • Gaul
City
  • Clermont

About the source:

Author: Gregory of Tours
Title: Life of the Fathers, Vita Patrum, Liber Vitae Patrum
Origin: Tours (Gaul)
Denomination: Catholic/Nicene/Chalcedonian
Gregory of Tours (bishop of Tours in Gaul in 573-594) started writing his Life of the Fathers some time before 587 and finished it around 592 or slightly later, as shown by the cross-references to his other works.  It is a collection of twenty Gallic saints` lives of different lengths. They all are in some way connected to Gregory`s family or church interests, while also exemplifying different virtues leading to sanctity. Saints presented in the Life of the Fathers are all either ascetics or bishops.
 
More on the text: James 1991, ix-xxv.
Edition:
B. Krusch ed., Gregorii Episcopi Turonensis Miracula et Opera Minora, Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Scriptores rerum Merovingicarum 1.2, Hannover 1885, 211-294.
 
Translation:
Gregory of Tours, Life of the Fathers, trans. by E. James, Liverpool 1991.

Categories:

Social origin or status - Clerical family
Entertainment - Feasting
Travel and change of residence
Former ecclesiastical career - Deacon
Further ecclesiastical career - Bishop
Described by a title - Presbyter/πρεσβύτερος
Act of ordination
Simony/Buying office
Patronage/Investiture
Relation with - Another presbyter
Relation with - Deacon
Relation with - Other relative
Relation with - Monarch and royal/imperial family
Please quote this record referring to its author, database name, number, and, if possible, stable URL: J. Szafranowski, Presbyters in the Late Antique West, ER24, http://www.presbytersproject.ihuw.pl/index.php?id=6&SourceID=24